Rick Burns

Fishing Report

Well, who wants to talk about more wind, water, or downed trees? Not I! Our newest postcard doesn’t read the “Sunshine State,” it may read “The Wet State.” 

Lets take this situation, however, turn it around and talk for a moment about the important effects the recent storms have had on local fishing. Also, stratagies we could use to make our upcoming fishing days productive. First and foremost, I for one have not been on the water in four of the last seven days. Not many have. Besides the business of cleanup and such, the fishing reports are almost non-existent. However, here are some useful insights I have gathered.

Wind. Its been coming from all directions lately, no definite pattern. One may experience southwest one day then northeast the next. If you can pick one, try west or southwest. In keeping these reasons short and sweet, remember I always have a method to my maddness — as my Dad liked to say. A good southwest wind blows in bait and flushes banks causing critters to come out and be exposed, or better yet, eating. And the game fish know it. Northeasters blow the water out, making navigation difficult, etc. For freshwater, follow the same guidelines and find your calm pockets and still sides. Easy Enough?

Next, the water. Whew, all I can say is the salty pond has been very ugly the last month or so. One may conclude it looks like a cross between Georgia clay and Coca-Cola, resulting from the tremendous amount of freshwater run-off and out-flow. Expect these conditions for awhile. However, it has not affected the ol’ “whiskerfish.” I somehow always expected the last two survivors on earth would be whitetail and the cockroaches. But now, I believe I should add the saltwater catfish.  Go catch a few hundred and clean em’ out a little. Remember, the game fishing will return to a prosperous stage when all this settles and clears. A few reasons would be besides the dropping air temp and water temp, these guys are starved. Baitfish are exposed and moving in, the fall feeding is on its way. Remember, we live in an area of the state that holds a huge amount of limestone, so one will have that run-off to contend with as well. It not only muddies up the water, but stirs up the silt. You should not have any trouble launching or navigating in your favorite freshwater area. Thats the good news. 

However, Mother Nature is at work and one cannot do much about it. The birds are getting fat and happy though.

All joking aside, remember this happy, positive, reeel fact. ... We live in the absolute best area in the world for what you are interested in reading about. Florida is the premier sportfishing capital of the world. And, central Florida is one of the best locations in the state. We Florida anglers are blessed to be able to fish 365 days a year if we have good weather. With almost 1,200 miles of coastline, pristine lakes and rivers, this is the place to be. We must practice patience. Fantastic gill ripping is just right around the corner. 

Take this time to organize tackle, prepare your boat and plan your strategy. Scalloping is still in full swing and should get better. Be prepared — October, November and December will be some of the best fishing times of the year. Its gonna be cool — but hot if ya know what I mean. 

Capt. Rick Burns runs Reel Burns Charters out of Homosassa. He can be contacted at 352-201-6111 or visit his website at www.homosassafishingguide.com.

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