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Military Matters

  • In Their Words: Red Level to Western Front

    C.J. Risak

    Correspondent

    Nolan Sassard has done a lot of traveling in his life, a great deal of it covering the central Florida area. It’s surprising considering his pace has not slackened, even though on July 27 — that’s today — he will turn 90.

     

    “I just don’t like to sit at home,” Sassard said insistently. “I’m not going to sit in the house 24 hours a day.”

  • In Their Words: Instrumental to victory

    C.J. Risak

    Correspondent

    Albert Giacchi died 13 years ago at the age of 76. A couple of years prior to his death, he was given at least some credit due to him for what he did during World War II, when he was given the opportunity to sail once again on the S.S. Jeremiah O’Brien.

     

  • In Their Words: Fighting 'Forgotten War'

    C.J. Risak

    Correspondent

    In another 25 years, a war in a country on the other side of this peninsula, which juts into the Bay of Bengal and the South China Sea, would dominate public opinion, particularly in the U.S. But in World War II, the fighting that dominated the country then known as Burma — now Myanmar — was referred to as the Forgotten War.

     

  • In Their Words: Taking a heavy toll

    By C.J. Risak, Correspondent

    Donald “Duckie” Robertson was 19 when he played his part in D-Day, the Normandy Invasion in World War II. Robertson was one of those unlucky enough to land at Omaha Beach, the site of the bloodiest battle of the invasion.

     

  • In Their Words: Brush with Danger

    C.J. Risak

    Chronicle

    Edward Popp will tell you he wasn’t anything special. During World War II, he was a lot like other guys — he joined because that was the right thing to do. But Popp got into a service that was a bit unappreciated, extremely dangerous and definitely a major factor in the winning of the war.

     

  • In Their Words: Perilous duty

    C.J. Risak

    Correspondent

    There’s a certain reluctance in Fred Simonson’s response when asked what he did during his time in the U.S. Navy during World War II. His reason: He wants people to know about the branch of the Navy he served in — the Armed Guard, rather than his own personal involvement.

     

  • In Their Words: Bowed, but not bent

    C.J. Risak

    Correspondent

    Richard Hunt never wanted to be a hero,

    although he

    admits thoughts like that may have lingered a bit when he initially enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps. He was only 17; the year was 1967.

     

  • In Their Words: Building a career

    C.J. Risak
    Correspondent
    In the Pacific campaign during World War II, the road to victory had to be paved. Guys like Arthur Devlin did just that.

  • Saluting a true hero

    It’s not every day you see a report about the death of someone you know on NBC’s Nightly News.

  • In Their Words: Lifetime of service

    C.J. Risak
    Correspondent
    Four years in the U. S. Navy weren’t enough for Hank Butler.
    After he left following the Korean War, he would add an additional 28 years to his military career, in the National Guard.