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Business

  • Selling Citrus

    When it comes to the selling of a magazine for Citrus County, not everyone is on the same page.

    There was some disagreement at this month’s Tourism Development Council (TDC) meeting as to what the county’s Visit Citrus 2017 magazine should look. Akers Media, hired to produce the magazine, came up with some cover mockups and interior pages that it thought were more sophisticated — and apt to garner greater attention from tourists — than the presentation in issues to date.

  • SCORE workshops announced

    Citrus County SCORE has two upcoming small business workshops scheduled at the College of Central Florida, Lecanto Campus.

    They are:

    • Tuesday, Oct. 25: Simple Steps for Growing Your Business-Session II, 6-7:30 p.m., Building C-4, Room 103. Session II covers marketing your business and increasing sales. 
    • Tuesday, Nov. 29: Simple Steps for Growing Your Business-Session III, 6 -7:30 p.m.,  Building C-4, Room 103. This session covers financial management and managing operations.
  • Homosassa welcomes two new stores

    Homosassa residents will soon be getting two new stores: Save-A-Lot and Ollie’s Bargain Outlet.
    Both will be located in the former Sweetbay grocery store in Homosassa Square, at the intersection of U.S. 19 and Yulee Drive. They should open in early 2017.
    Ollie’s is billed as one of the country’s largest retailers of close-out, excess inventory and salvage merchandise.

  • Deep South drought

    Jeff Martin
    Janet McConnaughey
    Associated Press
    ATLANTA
    Six months into a deepening drought, the weather is killing crops, threatening cattle and sinking lakes to their lowest levels in years across much of the South.
    The very worst conditions — what forecasters call “exceptional drought” — are in the mountains of northeast Alabama and northwest Georgia, a region known for its thick green forests, waterfalls and red clay soil.

  • Bed tax rates vary statewide

    Right now, Citrus County imposes a 3 percent tourist tax rate, which brought in $858,242 in 2015.
    That’s a 15 percent increase from the $746,451 the county netted in 2014. In 2013, the bed tax raised $629,535 — in part because of a failure by the county and property owners to collect the tax. Tourism officials shored up the collection issue in 2014.

  • How weather disasters impact businesses

    Fred Herzog
    Experience matters

  • Changing the culture

    Given the large number of small businesses in Citrus County, it is vital that owners accommodate as many people as possible, and that includes customers with dementia, according to Debbie Selsavage.
    But so many business employees lack the training to deal with those people, she said.
    That’s why Selsavage founded Coping with Dementia LLC., which specializes in Alzheimer’s and dementia care training and works with businesses to get employees educated about the disease.

  • Duke warns of scams

    This might be the season for good will but there are plenty of Scrooges out there to bring down the jolliest elf.
    Duke Energy is warning customers of utility scams prevalent this time of year. The company has about 46,000 customers in Citrus County. Of those, there were about 65 customers who reported having received bogus phone calls or been scammed between September 2015 and October 2016.
    Those victims paid out a total of about $13,500 to the scammers, according to Duke Energy.

  • Spotlight on career opportunity awareness

    Laura Byrnes
    Career source

  • Drill, baby, drill?

    Patrick Whittle
    Associated Press
    The controversy over drilling for oil in the Atlantic Ocean has been reignited by the election of Donald Trump, and environmentalists and coastal businesses say it could be the first major fault line that divides them from the new president.
    The Obama administration has moved to restrict access to offshore oil drilling leases in the Atlantic, as well as off Alaska. Commercial oil production has never happened off the East Coast and environmentalists consider that a major victory during Obama’s administration.